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Nicotine Lozenges

Drug Class: Commonly Known As: Category:
Nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) Nicotinell Adult

Nicotine Lozenges - Side Effects, Precautions, and Contraindications

What side effects can Nicotine Lozenges cause?

Common side effects

  • Throat irritation
  • Jaw ache
  • Increased salivation
  • Hiccups
  • Dry mouth
  • Flatulence
  • Stomach discomfort
  • Heart burn
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Dizziness
  • Headache

These side effects usually occur as a result of intense sucking of lozenges. Suck the lozenges slowly and take longer breaks in-between lozenges to reduce these side effects.

Rare but serious side effects:

The symptoms of a drug allergy include one or more of the following:

  • Swollen face/eyes/lips/ tongue
  • Difficulty in breathing
  • Itchy skin rashes over you whole body

If you experience any of these symptoms, you should stop your medication and see your healthcare professional immediately.

Before taking Nicotine Lozenges, what precautions must I follow?

​You should stop smoking once you start to use NRT. Smoking and using NRT at the same time may increase the risk of adverse side effects from the additive effects of nicotine in your body.

If you continue to feel the urge to smoke or experience severe nicotine withdrawal symptoms even after using the NRT lozenges, please inform your healthcare professional as you may need other types of NRT.

Inform your healthcare professional if:

  • You are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or breast feeding
  • You recently had a heart attack or stroke.
  • You have active peptic ulcer disease
  • You are using dentures
  • You have any other medical conditions
  • You are taking any other medications, including supplements, traditional medications and herbel remedies
  • You are less than 18 years old.

What food or medicine must I avoid when I take Nicotine Lozenges?

  • ​​Avoid coffee, tea, juices, acidic and frizzy drinks 15 minutes before and during use of nicotine lozenges as this may reduce nicotine absorption
  • Nicotine may reduce the effect of certain medications. When NRT dose is reduced or stopped, adjustments to these medications may be necessary.

These medications include:

  • Benzodiazepines (e.g. diazepam, lorazepam)
  • Insulin
  • Beta - blocker (e.g bisoprolol, atenolol)
  • Opioid painkillers (e.g. codeine)

Inform your doctor or pharmacist about other medications - including over-the counter medications, supplements, and traditional / herbal remedies - that you are currently taking as they may affect the way you benefit from NRT.

                    

Nicotine Lozenges - Additional Information

  • Tags: Nicotine replacement therapy (NRT)
  • Updated on Monday, March 1, 2021
  • Article contributed by PSS National Medication Information Workgroup PSS National Medication Information Workgroup

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